Keyword: screening

Are raised DGP-IgG levels an early sign of celiac disease?

Elevated DGP antibodies are often seen in patients with celiac disease on a gluten-containing diet. They appear to have exactly the same value of the more established tTG-IgA antibody test, and offer no advantage over tTG. However, it appears that in very young children (i.e., in the first two years of life) DGP do provide… Read more »

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Who should be tested for celiac disease?

Those who fall into the following categories should be tested for celiac disease: Children older than 3 and adults who are 1st-degree relatives of someone with celiac disease Persistent miscarriages or infertility Type I Diabetes Mellitus Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Asthma Multiple Sclerosis Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Down Syndrome Turner Syndrome William’s Syndrome… Read more »

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What does a “weak positive” blood test result for celiac disease mean?

Each lab defines “weak positive” differently. Unfortunately, diagnosis is not always a clear cut positive or negative. If you receive a weak positive, please work with your medical professional to determine the next best course of action. The diagnosis of celiac disease is like an iceberg; the obvious, symptomatic, yet smallest, part of it exists… Read more »

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Are blood tests reliable for infants?

Blood tests aren’t always accurate in children with symptoms younger than three years of age. Children often must have been eating wheat- or barley-based cereals for some time, up to one year, before they generate an autoimmune response to gluten that shows up in testing. A pediatric gastroenterologist should evaluate young children who are experiencing… Read more »

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