Keyword: prevalence

Is the prevalence of celiac disease increasing or decreasing?

The most recent studies in the United States continue to show that roughly 1% of the population has celiac disease. The prevalence has likely increased constantly over the previous decades, but probably not further rising in the last few years. In Northern Europe the prevalence has increased to approximately 2% of the population.

(Updated .)

Why does the prevalence of celiac disease double every 15-20 years?

At this time, no one knows for sure why the prevalence of celiac disease doubles every 15-20 years. We do know that the prevalence of all autoimmune diseases is on the rise. The most accepted theory for this is the “hygiene theory,” which states that as our cultures get cleaner our immune systems get weaker.

(Updated .)

What is the prevalence for others in my family to have celiac disease since I’ve been diagnosed with it?

Celiac disease is an inherited autoimmune disease. The prevalence of celiac disease in 1st-degree relatives (children, parents, siblings) has been reported by numerous studies around the world to be significantly higher than in the general population, hence the need to screen every 1st-degree relative. The actual prevalence varies among the published studies, between 4-16%. Our… Read more »

(Updated .)

Is celiac disease a rare condition?

No. Celiac disease affects at least 1% of the United States population, or nearly 3 million Americans—it’s the most prevalent genetic autoimmune disorder in the world. Yet, upwards of 90% of those who have it remain undiagnosed.

(Updated .)