Keyword: blood

What can I do about IgA deficiency?

You can’t do anything about IgA deficiency. However, it also doesn’t lead to any clinical issues. If you are attempting to get an accurate diagnosis for celiac disease and you know you’re IgA deficient, or if there is some other equivocating factor to potentially compromise the blood test, then an EMA blood test should also… Read more »

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In follow-up blood testing, why would tTG be negative and DGP be positive?

If the slightly positive test is the DGP-IgA, you can disregard this value, as it can be misleading. If the DGP-IgG is positive it probably means you’re ingesting small amounts of gluten, possibly from cross-contamination, which are raising antibodies but not enough to trigger a tTG or a mucosal response. Basically, in either case you… Read more »

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I’ve had serious internal bleeding that required hospitalization. I’ve also had multiple blood transfusions. Does celiac disease play a role in this?

Depending on age and other medical problems, possibilities include ulcerative jejunitis as a late complication of celiac disease as well as an AVM (arterio-venous malformation) or tumor (lymphoma or other) in the small intestine. You definitely need further evaluation of your small intestine. This is usually done by video capsule endoscopy or complete enteroscopy, depending… Read more »

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How is genetic testing different than antibody testing for celiac disease?

Blood tests, such as the tissue transglutaminase test (tTG) or the antiendomysial (EMA) antibody test, measure the autoimmune response triggered by gluten that occurs at that particular point in time. These are important tests because they characterize the extent to which the immune system is responding to gluten. Unlike antibody testing, the HLA genetic test… Read more »

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