FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

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Featured FAQs

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How much exposure to gluten does it take for DGP levels to become elevated and how long before they return to normal?

There is no general rule that applies to all, but we learn from each patient. That said, typically DGP levels are more sensitive to gluten than tTG, so their levels become elevated before tTG and go down sooner than tTG once the patient is on a gluten-free diet. August, 2015

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What common nutrient deficiencies might an adult experience prior to diagnosis?

Iron, calcium, and Vitamin D are the most common deficiencies, but some present with deficiencies in B12, copper, folate, magnesium, niacin, riboflavin, and/or zinc. Nutrient deficiencies associated with celiac disease are due to intestinal damage caused by protein in wheat, rye, and barley. In most cases, nutrient deficiencies that were caused by damage from celiac disease will naturally resolve as your intestine heals. Many gluten-free dieters choose foods that aren’t fortified with vitamins and minerals like their gluten-containing counterparts. Thus, we suggest a general multivitamin to prevent against nutritional deficiencies. August, 2015

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What is the prevalence for others in my family to have celiac disease since I’ve been diagnosed with it?

Celiac disease is an inherited autoimmune disease. The prevalence of celiac disease in first-degree relatives (such as children, parents, siblings) has been reported by numerous studies around the world to be significantly higher than in the general population, hence the need to screen every first-degree relative. The actual prevalence varies among the published studies, between 4 and 16%. Our own experience when testing for celiac disease in first-degree relatives is a prevalence around 5% (or 1:20). In second-degree relatives (such as aunts, uncles, and grandparents), the prevalence is around 2.6% (or 1:39). August, 2015

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