Categorized: Gluten-Free Diet

I feel better when I remove gluten from my diet, is that okay?

Although popular culture promotes a gluten-free diet as a healthier way to eat, there is no scientific evidence that proves such a claim to be true. In fact, studies have shown the risk of essential nutrient deficiency in those that do not have a medical reason for following a gluten-free diet. We recommend that anyone… Read more »

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What is carbohydrate deficiency?

If deficient in carbohydrates, the body will utilize protein and fats for energy. Carbohydrates are the body’s most preferred source of energy, and it is not recommended to avoid this group of foods when avoiding gluten. The body is an efficient energy burner, and will take or make glucose from other sources and use it… Read more »

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Is transglutaminase harmful if ingested by a person with celiac disease?

We ingest tissue transglutaminase practically every day when we eat animals since it’s a ubiquitous enzyme for many species. Transglutaminase is part of an immense repertoire of proteins that are mostly destroyed by cooking and are fully digested before being absorbed. It’s not harmful to those with celiac disease.

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Is it really that bad to get “glutened?”

Yes. Although each celiac patient has a different threshold of sensitivity, we know that as little as 10 mg of gluten in a day can cause the disease to become active. Repeated exposure is detrimental to those with celiac disease, so it is imperative to strictly avoid gluten.

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How often can I eat oats?

Research reports that incorporating oats uncontaminated with wheat, barley or rye at intake levels of approximately 50 g dry oats/day is generally safe for most persons with celiac disease.

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What nutrient deficiencies might I experience on a gluten-free diet?

Deficiency is variable depending on what you’re consuming. Many whole foods (like rice, potatoes & corn) are naturally gluten-free, but low in nutritional benefit. A large percentage of B vitamin intake comes traditionally from enriched breads and cereals. However, gluten-free breads and cereals are often not enriched. A dietitian experienced with gluten-free diets should evaluate… Read more »

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Are there some celiacs who can’t eat oats?

Pure and uncontaminated oats have been shown to be safe for most celiac patients. We recommend oats in the diet because of their high fiber content. With that said, the additional fiber that oats provide may cause GI symptoms similar to those of undiagnosed celiac disease. However, tolerance improves over time.

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Is it safe for me to consume maltose?

Maltose is, technically, a sugar derived from barley, so it’s actually on our unsafe list. However, as with most starch products, maltose is typically refined and doesn’t contain any protein, thus making it gluten free.

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