Categorized: Celiac Disease Diagnosis

What is dermatitis herpetiformis (DH)?

Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) is an itchy, blistering skin condition that’s a form of celiac disease. The rash usually occurs on the elbows, knees and/or buttocks, and is characterized by its bilateral nature; both knees (and/or both arms) are affected, seldom just one. Many people with DH have no digestive symptoms and only about 40% of… Read more »

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If I have a gene for celiac disease, does that I mean I have it?

Genetics don’t diagnose celiac disease. They do, however, clarify whether an individual is “at-risk” for it. If this is the case, you should closely monitor your symptoms and submit to blood tests every 2-3 years or immediately upon the onset of symptoms. When the genetic predisposition for celiac disease was detected (on Chromosome 6) researchers… Read more »

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What is an endoscopic biopsy?

Biopsy of the small intestine is the standard way to diagnose celiac disease. This procedure is always performed by a gastroenterologist, and is conducted most often in an outpatient surgical suite. The procedure lasts less than an hour, and includes sedation and local anesthesia. The procedure involves a long, thin tube with a small camera… Read more »

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Who should be tested for celiac disease?

Those who fall into the following categories should be tested for celiac disease: Children older than 3 and adults who are 1st-degree relatives of someone with celiac disease Persistent miscarriages or infertility Type I Diabetes Mellitus Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Asthma Multiple Sclerosis Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Down Syndrome Turner Syndrome William’s Syndrome… Read more »

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