Categorized: Celiac Disease Diagnosis

I’ve heard that I don’t necessarily have to endure 12 weeks of eating gluten if I have a severe reaction. Is that true? How does it work?

The gut needs time to mount an antibody response that can be measured in the blood, which is why we recommend 12 weeks of eating gluten. If you experience symptoms immediately, it’s likely that the gut itself has quickly become damaged. In these cases, you and your medical professional could consider a shorter gluten challenge… Read more »

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Should someone with elevated liver enzymes be screened for celiac disease?

Elevated liver enzymes are one of the extra-intestinal signs of celiac disease, so patients with elevated liver enzymes should be tested for it. If the enzyme increase was caused by celiac disease it should return to normal after following a strict gluten-free diet. If not, then you should seek another reason for the elevated enzymes.

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What else can cause villus atrophy in the small intestine other than celiac disease?

There are many causes for villus atrophy, the most common being immune deficiencies, food allergies and Giardia infections. In addition, Crohn’s disease is known to be often associated with low positive tTG and the changes in the duodenal biopsies can indeed be similar. Causes of Villous Atrophy Other Than Celiac Disease Giardiasis Collagenous sprue Common-variable immunodeficiency… Read more »

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What’s the problem with diagnosing celiac disease simply by measuring the decrease in antibodies once someone switches to a gluten-free diet?

The con is that you’ll never know if a patient truly has celiac disease versus other causes for elevated antibodies. tTG are thought to be 97-98% specific, but by definition this means that 3 in 100 persons who don’t have celiac disease will have elevated tTG (biological variations, nothing more). If you consider that celiacs… Read more »

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